If you are considering installing a wood burning or solid fuel stove - whether to save some cash or to be more environmentally friendly - it is likely that your main considerations thus far have been aesthetic; however, there are a number of crucial practical factors that come into play when putting in a stove, with the most important probably the location of the existing flue or chimney.

Positioning your stove

Before buying your dream stove, take some time to think about the best position for it. If you already have a chimney and fireplace, this is likely to be a decent site; however, this will not always be as straightforward as you may think. In a period property, the fireplace is likely to have been designed for a coal fire and is unlikely to conform to the current building regulation requirement and the chimney may need to be lined.

Existing fireplace?

If you are planning to place a wood burning stove in a vacant fireplace, you will also need to ensure that there is sufficient room around it for the circulation of air and that all smoke will be efficiently pulled from the room. It will also need to be sufficiently wide enough & ensure that anything combustible (ie a wood surround) is legally far enough away so that it does not create a fire hazard

Rules and regulations

There are several rules and regulations that you will need to navigate regarding the ventilation in the room, the flue size, and carbon monoxide detectors. It is often simpler all round to get the installation done from start to finished by a Hetas registered professional, as they will be used to ticking all the boxes when it comes to the practicalities and legalities. If you do not get the installation signed off by building control, you may find that you have hoops to jump through when it comes to selling your property; therefore, it is important get things done correctly right from the get-go.

Building Control

Building Control takes an interest in the fitting of wood/solid fuel stoves due to the plethora of rules pertaining to their safe installation. You could choose to do the work yourself, but remember that you will need to get the project inspected and signed off by a HETAS-approved engineer.